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Do you think your horse is suffering from gastric ulcers?

Save £100 at the Holsworthy clinic gastroscopy day - 28 June 2017


Gastric ulceration is very common. Recent studies have shown up to 90% of racehorses, up to 50% of leisure horses and 50% of foals are affected.

Symptoms are often vague. The use of gastroscopy can diagnose gastric ulcers which can then be treated quickly and effectively.

Penbode Equine Vets are holding their next gastroscopy day on Wednesday 28 June at the Holsworthy clinic, where you can get £100 off a scoping.

Contact your local Penbode Equine Clinic to find out more and to make your booking.

Tavistock -01822 613838 
Holsworthy - 01409 255549

PENBODE 2017 WORMING SCHEME

We apologise for the glitch in formatting some recipients of our email about the Penbode Equine Vets' Worming Scheme. We are sending it again to make it easier to read.

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Do the right thing for your horse and save money with Penbode Equine Vets€™ Grazing Season worming scheme
In order to adopt a targeted strategic worm control plan for your horse and save you money, Penbode Equine Vets advise that you should have a worm egg count done on each of your horses in May/June, and a second one in August. We can then advise you whether worming of your horse is required or is unnecessary, potentially reducing your worming costs and delaying the development or resistance.

Each Penbode Equine Vets Worming Pack contains:
- Two sample bags €“ for the May/June and August counts €“ labelled with the dates to sample
- Full instructions of how and when to collect samples
- An Equitape syringe for tapeworm treatment in July for up to 600kg bwt 

Only £33.72 per pack inc VAT 

When should I have the first red worm egg count done?
May or June is the best time. The dung sample should only be collected when your horse has not been wormed for at least eight weeks (13 weeks if you last used the Equest wormer) otherwise you could have an artificially low worm egg count. Please seek individual advice from our vets for all horses less than four years old and pregnant mares. 

Tapeworms
We blood tested a number of horses in previous years for tapeworm levels and have concluded that twice yearly (July and December) treatment for tapeworms is advisable in our area. 

What to do next
Contact us on 01409 255549 / 01822 613838 and order your Penbode Equine Vets worming pack 

Only £33.72 per pack inc VAT* 

Orders: Must be received at the clinic on or before Friday 28 April 2017.

Collection: Worming packs will be available from the clinic on or after Friday 5 May. 

Payment: FULL payment will be required when your order is placed. Six or more packs attract a 2.5% discount if on a single order with a single payment. 

*Ts&Cs apply.

If your horse is tail rubbing and you suspect Pinworms please call us on 01409 255549 / 01822613838 to discuss appropriate treatment.

A blood test for tapeworm antibodies can be performed for an additional fee if required.
Download

Penbode in Horse & Hound

Penbode Equine Vet Kieran O'Brien's article on smelly stables has seen remarkable success on Facebook. 

So we offered it to Horse & Hound and are delighted to see they're running it in the 9 March issue. 

Thank you to Horse & Hound :-)

Download the article or click here to read the article.

Do you think your horse is suffering from gastric ulcers?

Gastroscopy Days - Save £100
Tavistock clinic - 30 March 2017
Holsworthy clinic - 12 April 2017


Gastric ulceration is very common. Recent studies have shown up to 90% of racehorses, up to 50% of leisure horses and 50% of foals are affected.

Symptoms are often vague. The use of gastroscopy can diagnose gastric ulcers which can then be treated quickly and effectively.

Penbode Equine Vets are holding regular gastroscopy days. The next are on 30 March at the Tavistock clinic and on 12 April at the Holsworthy clinic. You can get £100 off a scoping at both venues.

Contact your local Penbode Equine Clinic to find out more and to make your booking.

Tavistock -01822 613838 
Holsworthy - 01409 255549

Concerned about Strangles?

We have received phone calls from concerned horse owners wanting to discuss the facts about €˜Strangles€™.  Although I am sure you will respect that we are unable to breach client confidentiality with regards to specific incidences, we want to do our best to give good advice. 

We hope that the following notes may be of assistance.  If you have any further questions please call Penbode Equine Vets on 01409 255549 / 01822 613838 / 01837 506070.

What is the causing agent of €˜Strangles€™?
A bacteria called Streptococcus equi equi.

What is the incubation period?
This is variable. Typically this is 2-21 days.

How is it transmitted?
Typically this is by contact with nasal discharges or with material from burst abscesses. This can be by direct nose to nose contact of horses, or via water troughs or mangers. It is also easily spread by contaminated clothing and utensils. 

Up to 10% of previously infected horses can be €˜silent carriers€™: they shed contagious bacteria into the environment without actually showing any clinical signs of disease.

What are the clinical signs?
The classical signs are an increased rectal temperature (greater than 38.5 degrees C), loss of appetite, depression and cough. As the infection progresses, a thick creamy nasal discharge can develop, as well as pain, swelling and abscess formation of the lymph nodes in the jaw (sub-mandibular) or throat (parotid) areas. Young animals are most susceptible.

Milder signs such as short term fever, dullness, loss of appetite and mild nasal discharge are increasingly common and may also be evidence of a previous or ongoing infection.

On rare occasions Strangles can lead to life-threatening conditions such as a spread of bacteria in the blood stream (€˜Bastard€™ strangles), or inflammation of the blood vessels with swelling (oedema) and/ or small areas of bleeding in the limbs, sheath, gums and eyes.
 
How is it diagnosed?
There are several methods for detecting the bacteria:
  • Nasopharyngeal (deep throat) swabs, 
  • Swabs of material from abscesses, 
  • Collection of a sample from the guttural pouches with an endoscope (guttural pouch lavage). 
  • Blood tests can also be used to detect raised or rising antibodies.
 
It is important to note some of these tests are better than others and that none are 100% accurate, some giving false negative results. Depending on the stage of the disease and on the type of clinical sign shown, several different tests may occasionally need to be run over a few days in order to get an accurate diagnosis. 

What is the treatment?
This is based around nursing care and anti-inflammatory medication.
  • Hot packs can encourage abscess bursting and drainage. Cleaning and flushing of ruptured abscesses will speed the resolution.
  • Antibiotic treatment may be appropriate in some but not all cases. 
Following recovery, a guttural pouch lavage should be performed to confirm complete recovery, as up to 10% of apparently recovered horses can continue carrying and shedding this bacteria silently for months or years. 

What is the prevention?
Strict biosecurity policies:
  • Quarantine new horses for three weeks prior to entry to the main yard. 
  • Discuss with your vet the value of ensuring that new horses have a blood test in the week preceding entry into the main yard. 
  • Discuss with your vet the value of routine screening blood tests of horses already on the yard to identify carriers. 
What do you do if an outbreak is confirmed or strongly suspected?
  • Prevent horses leaving or entering the yard until you have spoken to your vet.  
  • Alert all visitors to the yard.
  • Speak to your vet to help institute a barrier nursing and isolation protocol for your yard.
  • If unclear, investigate the source of infection.  
  • Refer to HBLB Strangles guidelines in the Codes of Practice ( https://codeshblb.org.uk ) and Strategy To Eradicate and Prevent Strangles (STEPS at https://www.strangles.org/). 
Although there is a vaccine available in the UK, it should not be used in the face of an outbreak. It can however be used as part of strangles prevention strategy. If you are interested, we recommend a yard risk assessment be performed at your yard. 
 
If you have any further questions do not hesitate to contact Penbode Equine Vets, Holsworthy 01409 255549 / Okehampton 01837 506070 / Tavistock 01822 613838, www.penbodevets.co.uk/news.php

Horse vets serving Holsworthy, Okehampton, Tavistock, Launceston, Bude / Stratton, Camelford / Bodmin and Bradworthy
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